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Roselyn House School and The RHISE Service

Pathway to Adulthood Curriculum Policy and Procedures

 

Introduction

All students at Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service have an Education, Health and Care Plan. This Pathway to Adulthood Curriculum Policy has been written with due regard to how we can support our young people and their Parents/Carers with special educational needs, disabilities, learning difficulties and mental health to prepare for adult life.

Adulthood is a time of significant change for young people; especially when they have disabilities. There are many decisions and choices for young people, their families and carers to make about the future related to daily life. This can be complicated as support from education, health and social care may change when they get to 18.

This Policy has been written with reference to Preparing for Adulthood Pathway Guide- Haringey Council and The Preparing for Adulthood programme (PfA) delivered by the National Development Team for inclusion (NDTi). (The programme is funded by the Department for Education as part of the Delivering Better Outcomes Together consortium.)

 

Aim

It is our aim at Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service to build into the curriculum from Year 9 a clear Pathway to Adulthood which is introduced through PSHE, SEAL and Enterprise and Employability programmes of study. This will then be reflected in the Annual Review process within the school. Advice will be sought from the young person, their Parents/ Carers, Social Care, Health and other Professionals where appropriate.

The Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Code of Practice 2015 states local authorities and others should normally engage directly with the young person when they turn 16, rather than their Parents. However, the young person’s family/ parents/carers should continue to be involved in discussions about the young person’s future. The young person may also ask them to help in other ways such as attending meetings, filling in forms or receiving correspondence on their behalf.

After the age of 16 young people have the right to make requests and decisions under the Children and Families Act 2014. These include the right to:

  • Request an assessment for an EHCP.
  • Make representation about what is included in their plan.
  • Request an education setting to be named in their plan.
  • Request a personal budget as part of their EHCP.
  • Appeal to the First-tier Tribunal (SEND) if they are not happy with their plan.

The local authority and school should continue to involve Parents/ Carers until the young person is 18, although the final decision lies with the young person.

Through our Pathway to Adulthood Curriculum we aim to develop a young person and their Parent/ Carers knowledge in order to successfully prepare their way to the different stages of transition into adulthood.

In line with the PfA, we believe that young people with SEND should have equal life chances as they move into adulthood.

This should include paid employment and higher education, housing options and independent living, good health, friends, relationships, community inclusion and choice and control over their lives and support.

At Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service we aim to keep our students safe by:

Cultural Safety: An environment where their background and experiences are respected and acknowledge as valid and important. For example, they are treated with respect, kindness and curiosity. Their history and culture are considered when making decisions about the child. 

Physical Safety: An environment where they are safe from being physically hurt. For example, where no-one will kick, hit, shake, drown or burn or deliberately pretends a child is ill or purposefully makes them ill.

Emotional Safety: An environment where they are safe from being emotionally hurt in any way. For example, shaming, teasing, taunting, threatening, isolating, ignoring, inappropriate expectations or silencing.

Social Safety: An environment where they can be taught how to make positive and meaningful relationships with other people. For example, key adults’ model respectful relationships with other parents, colleagues & professionals and the child has opportunities to meet and socialise with their peers and a school environment where relationships are prioritised.

(See SEAL and Wellbeing Policy)

 

Preparing for Adulthood Reviews

EHC Plans should be used to actively monitor children and young people’s progress towards their outcomes and future ambitions. The plans must be reviewed every 12 months.

The Year 9 EHC plan review and every subsequent annual review must focus on preparing for adulthood. This should include support in the following areas:

  • To find suitable post-16 pathways that lead to outcomes for employment or higher education; training opportunities.
  • To find a job and help to understand benefits.
  • To prepare for independent living, including exploring decisions young people want to make for themselves discussing.
  • Where they want to live in the future and the support they will need.
  • Local housing options and support to find accommodation.
  • Housing benefits and money matters.
  • Eligibility for social care.
  • To maintain good health and wellbeing in adulthood.
  • To plan continuing health services from children to adult’s services and helping young people understand which health professional may work with them as adults; ensuring those professional understand the young person’s needs. This should include the production of a Health Action Plan and prompts for annual health checks for young people with learning disabilities;
  • Travel support to enable independence.
  • To participate and maintain relationships in the community – including support on activities in the community.

Reviews should be person-centred, consider what is working, what is not working well and what is important to the young person and what is important for the young person as they progress towards adult life.

 

Post 16 education

At Roselyn House School, most of our Post 16 courses of study take place within The RHISE Service. This may be Sixth Form or individualised bespoke Programmes of Learning. These courses can take place at The RHISE Centre, within the home, in the community or with Alternative Providers.

These students have a clear study plan that enables them to achieve the best possible outcomes in adult life. The RHISE Service ensures courses enable progression to a qualification or work placement that is meaningful to the student without repeating learning already completed.

Vocational work placements/ Alternative Providers ensure activities prepare the young person for healthy, independent living that supports building relationships and engagement in the community.

From the Year 11 review, a plan is stated that a young person may want to stay at Roselyn House School and move into Post 16 provision. In most cases a proposal will have to be submitted to the local authority along with explanation from local mainstream colleges as to why they are unable to meet the student’s needs.

This process will be repeated in the Year 12 review in order for a student to stay in Year 13. On occasions it may be agreed that a student can be funded for 2 years Post 16 Provision within The RHISE Service.

In exceptional circumstances a student may be granted to stay until they are 19 in order to repeat Year 13. (An example for this would be that they may have missed education due to significant hospitalisation).

 

Preparing for Adulthood Strands

It is the intention at Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service that The Adulthood Pathway Curriculum would begin in Year 9 and be taught through PSHE, SEAL and Physical Education Schemes of Work. This would be further developed in Year 10 and Year 11. Post 16 would follow further pathways of study to include Enterprise and Employability, Life Skills, 1:1 SEAL, Sport Programmes.

However, we are realistic in that many of our students can start at varying times in their education development and a Pathway individualised for their need will be implemented at the time of starting with us.

 

The strands that run through the Adulthood Pathway are as follows:

  • Education and Health Care Plan and needs assessment process.
  • Friends, Relationships and My Community.
  • Good health.
  • Developing Independence.
  • Preparing for and finding employment.

 

Education and Health Care Plan and Needs Assessment Process

This will be run through the Annual Review in conjunction with SEN Service and other relevant agencies. Views will be sought from young people and their families. This will be through All About Me and Learning Goals and Parental/ Carer view forms and discussion pre-meeting, during and post review. This will be in addition to advice from Health, Social Care and other professionals who may be relevant. This will be available in an Annual Review Document and Annual Review Summary.

 

Friends, Relationships and My Community

During Yr. 9, Yr. 10 and Yr. 11, this strand will be delivered through the PSHE and SEAL schemes of work appropriate to the key stages.

Students will learn:

Key Stage 3:

  • How to develop and maintain a variety of healthy relationships within a range of social/cultural contexts and to develop parenting skills.
  • How to recognise and manage emotions within a range of relationships.
  • How to deal with risky or negative relationships including all forms of bullying (including the distinct challenges posed by online bullying) and abuse, sexual and other violence, and online encounters.
  • About the concept of consent in a variety of contexts (including in sexual relationships).
  • About managing loss including bereavement, separation, and divorce.
  • To respect equality and be a productive member of a diverse community how to identify and access appropriate advice and support.

Key Stage 4:

  • Personal Action Planning.
  • Drugs Education.
  • Sex and Relationship Education.
  • Personal Finance.
  • Emotional Wellbeing.
  • Healthy Lifestyles.
  • Making Informed Career Choices.
  • Applying for Jobs and Courses.
  • Relationships, Behaviour and Practices in the Workplace.
  • Personal Safety (physical, emotional, and online).
  • Being a Critical Consumer.
  • Introduction to Diversity, Prejudice and Discrimination.

 

Post 16, these will be run as community sessions and will look at AO’s in a specific SEAL Scheme of Work but delivered on a 1:1 basis by Mentors in the community. This will cover areas such as:

Self-Awareness

  • AO1: Knowing myself
  • AO2: Understanding my feelings

Managing my feelings

  • AO3: Managing my expression of emotions
  • AO4: Changing uncomfortable feelings and increasing pleasant feelings

Motivation

  • AO5: Working towards goals
  • AO6: Persistence, resilience and optimism
  • AO7: Evaluation and Review

Empathy

  • AO8: Understanding the thoughts and feelings of others
  • AO9: Valuing and supporting others

Social Skills

  • AO10: Building and maintaining relationships
  • AO11: Belonging to groups
  • AO12: Solving problems, including interpersonal ones

This will be co-ordinated by a lead with tracking produced to feed into reports. There will also be AQA Units designed to be achieved by students. The aim will be to promote student wellbeing, resilience, confidence, develop interests, understand what local facilities are on offer, promote appropriate and sustainable friendship groups. It will look at if the family requires further support which then can be requested and dealt with for CLA or Safeguarding Leads.

 

Good Health

For all Key stages, work will be done with school nurses, GP, CAMHS and Social Care and advice will be sought for Annual Review process.

Students will learn about Healthy Eating, fitness, GP and Health checks as part of the PSHE curriculum and through Physical Education and Science lessons.

Students will be introduced to the concept of a lifestyle that constitutes being healthy is one which you:

  • Take part in physical activity.
  • Eat a balanced diet.
  • Avoid harmful substances such as drugs, smoking and alcohol.
  • Sustain friendships.

They will explore:

Social benefits of exercise are those which:

  • Develop teamwork and cooperation.
  • Overcome challenges in a team against the opposition.
  • Increase your self-worth.
  • Meet new people and make friends.

 

Physical benefits of exercise are those which:

  • Increase your life expectancy.
  • Improve muscle tone and posture.
  • Strengthen bones.
  • Improve flexibility and cardiovascular fitness.
  • Makes you look good and feel good.
  • Burns off stored fat.

 

Mental benefits of exercise are those which:

  • Relieves stress, tension and aggression.
  • Provides excitement and enjoyment.
  • Improves self-esteem and confidence.
  • Develops a sense of being part of something.
  • Provides opportunities for success.
  • Allow you to forget life’s problems.

 

Post 16 this work will continue through the PSHE/ Life Skills sessions and Sport.

 

Developing Independence

At Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service we aim to support students but lead them on a path to independence by developing confidence in their selves and their abilities as a learner.

Opportunities are provided in Key Stage 3 for independent learning and are further established at Key stage 4 in participating in vocational activities which may include Alternative provision.

The PSHE Curriculum will allow for students in Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 to develop understanding of Housing, benefits, money, NI and Tax, Bank Accounts, Personal budgets, finance, independent living skills. This is further enhanced by the Enterprise and Employability and Life Skills Curriculum.

There will be some cross over for independent travel with Friends, Relationships and my Community. Students may complete AQA Units for PSHE and Level 1 Award/ Certificate in Employability and in addition Level 1 Award/ Certificate in Enterprise.

https://www.qualhub.co.uk/media/17215/l1-a-c-employability-skills-601-4680-1-601-4681-3-qualification-specification-v73.pdf

https://collins.co.uk/pages/secondary-citizenship-and-pshe-your-life

This will be co-ordinated by a lead and schemes of work available for all Tutors to access. This will then be tracked on an Individual Learners Log for Enterprise and Employability and on a PSHE Tracking which can inform reporting.

 

Preparing for and finding employment

Where appropriate planning for a Career Plan or Vocational Profile will begin in Year 9 within the Transitional Annual Review. This will follow the students formal or informal Pathway. This will be built in the Learning Goals/ All About me for future planning and aspirations. Discussions will begin for work experience/ vocational from Year 10.

In Year 10 students will have updated career plans and be supported in accessing information about employment/ training or apprenticeships. Actions to work towards outcomes and visits with post 16 providers including RHISE/ Sixth Form. This will continue in Year 11 where work experience will be reviewed and further opportunities planned.

Independent travel will be further discussed and if it is feasible to be achieved by the student. Personal Budget and Direct Payment or other funding will be discussed if it is available to support employment. This will also include students who stay on with The RHISE Service, post 16 where proposals for Year 12 will be submitted to the authority.

In Year 12 and 13 the career plan and vocational plan will continue to be updated and all possible options will be explored in employment, education and training. Again, proposals for Year 13 will be submitted to the authority. Students may be able to apply for ESA.

In Year 9, 11, 12 and 13, the Annual Review will be supported by discussions around career planning and vocational profiles.

At the end of Year 13, students should have been supported to Transition into a new education/ training placement or employment.

This will be co-ordinated by careers/ vocational Lead across all school. This will be monitored. If a student is not able to continue to access their chosen transition further support may be offered through RHISE’s leavers drop in service.

 

Preparing for Transition through Adulthood Pathway Strands

Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service through systems of tracking, monitoring and assessment develop an understanding of each of our students and their individuals. This along with contributions from staff who work closely with them forms a fully rounded assessment of Adulthood Pathway needs.

It is important that this Policy is explained to staff and students and is worked on in collaboration with individual needs. Training is provided for staff and specific Leads are designated for each strand.

We want our young people to overcome many barriers that they may have had along the way to becoming an adult and to achieve the best that they can for their selves. We encourage friendships, support and understanding of own and others’ needs, welcome community activities, the importance of leading healthy lifestyles and developing as an individual in order to live in society as a positive citizen.

Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Service and family members support young people to acquire independent living skills such as travel training, basic cookery skills, personal care and money management. Moving away from home is a huge step and should be thought through carefully. We have adopted a Friday food pack, where students take ingredients and a recipe home in order to challenge their selves and their families to produce a new meal. We also have Life Skills and Cooking as part of the curriculum and through Alternative providers.

We promote positive and supportive relationships among our school community and introduce our young people to activities outside of school. It is important that young people maintain friendships after school ends. Local community centres, libraries, youth clubs, churches, galleries, café’s and schools offer a range of daytime and evening events and activities to help make new friends. These range from dance classes, music, singing as well as Scouts, Guides, art and pottery. Information is publicised on noticeboards and the internet.

We encourage students to attend their meetings and make their own decisions where possible and to seek out advice from others.

 

 

Education and Health Care (EHC) Plan and Needs Assessment Process

Year 9: 13-14

  • Preparing for Adulthood Review coordinated by the school.
  • EHC Plan reviewed, and new outcomes recorded.
  • Parents and young person fact-find about post 16 provision, referring to Local Offer.
  • Adult social care services work with Children’s services to review young people who may be eligible for care services as an adult (e.g., complex needs)
  • School to send review notes to SEN Service.

Year 10: 14-15

  • Yr10 Annual Review.
  • EHC Plan reviewed, and outcomes updated.
  • Parents and young person to visit post 16 options.
  • If likely to have a change of environment post – 16 e.g., move from school to college, consider what might be needed for a smooth transition.
  • Adult social care referral for transition to be considered – timelines for assessment taken into consideration.

Year 11: 15-16

  • EHC Plan reviewed.
  • Young person decides on post-16 option.
  • Health and Social Care may continue transition planning.
  • If moving on from school, post-16 placement confirmed by 31st March if an EHC Plan is in place.
  • Multi-agency panel involved if request is for a specialist placement at college.
  • Plan move if going to new environment.
  • Consider whether all appropriate professionals/organisations are involved (including advocacy).
  • Consider need to include/inform GP.
  • Future education: Think about practicality of distance, travel routes hours and days of course as well as motivation, interest and personal development.
  • Identify any informal carers involved (including young carers) – undertake/review Carers Assessment as required.
  • Identify and involve key adult professionals required for when the young person becomes 18 years and over and invite to Annual Review meeting.
  • Identify any adaptations or equipment used that requires review or maintenance post-18 years and confirm arrangements for maintenance contracts.
  • Identify any adaptations required and implications of this within transition.
  • Consider if any siblings are young carers and should have Care Act assessment.

Year 12: 16-17

  • EHC Plan reviewed.
  • Young person decides on post-16 option.
  • Health and Social Care may continue transition planning.
  • If moving on from school, post-16 placement confirmed by 31st March if an EHC Plan is in place.
  • Multi-agency panel involved if request is for a specialist placement at college.
  • Plan move if going to new environment.
  • Consider how annual review can be joined up with any other reviews.
  • Parents and young person discuss potential post-19 options with school and key worker and plan visits.

 

Adult Assessment:

  • Information for assessment of needs and outcomes.
  • Consider any specialist adult assessment required before 18yrs to support.
  • Identify any equipment used that requires review or maintenance etc.
  • Provide information about personal budgets.
  • Gather information about current care packages.
  • Consider appropriate funding streams.
  • Consider community services.
  • Identify informal carers involved (including young carers) – undertake/review.
  • Carers Assessment as appropriate and consider transitional arrangements.

Year 13: 17- 18

  • Mental Capacity Act: ensure young person has support to make informed decisions.
  • Prepare young person for adulthood at 18.
  • Person-centred Annual Review meeting to identify actions/support to enable preparation for adulthood:
  • Consider the content of any future study programme and how it will enable outcomes to be achieved.
  • Consider professionals to be involved in meetings.
  • Agree Lead Professional – who will monitor delivery of actions agreed.

Adult Social Care:

  • Confirm eligibility.
  • Finalise Assessment of Needs and Outcomes and advise of Indicative Budget.
  • Create Care and Support Plan with Young Person.

 

 

Friends, Relationships and My Community

Year 9: 13-14

  • Think about young person’s friendship group, closest friend (s), and other key people in their network (circle of support)
  • Support young person to develop and keep friendships – identify how the curriculum can help.
  • Family has information about support they can access.
  • Think about any out of school activities the young person does or would like to access.
  • Think about the time that the young person spends away from home/family that will support building friendships.

Year 10: 14-15

  • Begin to discuss what is important to the young person about friends/social life in the future and how this might be achieved.
  • How often is young person going out with friends? Is this enough? Is more advice or support needed?
  • Is the family accessing any information, is there support they may need?

Year 11: 15-16

  • Think about how to maintain friendships after school ends.
  • Support young person to plan how to keep in touch with others and vice versa.
  • Can/does young person access local services such as sports centres, libraries, cinemas, restaurants, shopping centres?
  • Is family accessing any information or support they may need?
  • Young people and families understand if they are eligible for short breaks post-18 and what is available.

Year 12: 16-17

  • Talk about the young person’s social group making sure they are able to remain in touch with friends and make arrangements for socialising.
  • Is any additional advice or support required to develop or maintain friendships and/or social life?
  • Is the young person able to:
  • Access local services?
  • Travel/get out when they choose, either on their own, with friends or with support?
  • Use a telephone, mobile, email, social networking, public transport, learning to drive etc?
  • If not, explore possible solutions.

Year 13: 17-18

  • Talk about the young person’s social group making sure they are able to remain in touch with friends and make arrangements for socialising.
  • Is any additional advice or support required to develop or maintain friendships and/or social life?
  • Is the young person able to:
  • Access local services?
  • Travel/get out when they choose, either on their own, with friends or with support?
  • Use a telephone, mobile, email, social networking, public transport, learning to drive etc?
  • If not, explore possible solutions.

 

 

Good Health

Year 9:

13-14

  • Begin to plan how resources/services will be accessed in adult life e.g., equipment, therapies, specialist support, prescriptions, dentist, optician, diet & exercise, sexual health etc.
  • People with learning disabilities are entitled to an Annual Health Check from age 14 – ask at GP Surgery about an Annual Health Check (see useful resources)
  • Health Transition lead to be identified if needed.

Year 10: 14-15

  • Ensure health professionals (e.g., Practice Nurse and Community Nurse) share information.
  • Think about Personal Health Budgets, if eligible.
  • Annual Health Check via GP if eligible and GP surgery is participating in the scheme.
  • Identify any informal carers.
  • Consider carers assessments.

Year 11: 15-16

  • Young person should be enabled to give their views and will be of a legal age to consent to medical treatment.
  • Ensure young person and family know when they will be discharged from each of the services they use now and who will take over responsibility.
  • Ensure young person/family knows how their health needs will be met.
  • Annual health check via GP if eligible.
  • If educated out of area plans to be made for accessing local health services on their return.
  • Consider Continuing Health Care assessment/needs (Adults) – complete and submit Continuing Health Care Checklist and Nursing assessment (just prior to age 17).
  • Gather information to inform Decision Support Tool and identify and involve any key adult professionals required for post – 18 years: appropriate planned introductions and handover.
  • Consider need to include/inform GP.

Year 12: 16-17

  • Ensure young person/family are in control of financial support for keeping healthy.
  • Relevant professionals work together and share information/understand how to communicate with the young person.
  • Annual Health Check via GP if eligible.
  • If educated out of area plans to be made for accessing local health services on their return.
  • Identify post-18 support available and pathways for accessing these.
  • Continuing Health Care (Adults) Assessment – consider whether this is appropriate and agree who is best placed to complete Nursing Assessment and CHC Checklist.
  • CHC Checklist to be completed by 17.5yrs.
  • Mental Capacity Act (2005) to be considered in relation to the specific decisions included in the Preparing for Adulthood Pathway.

Year 13: 17-18

  • Continuing Healthcare (Adults) – if triggered against the Checklist, Decision Support Tool to be completed. Confirm eligibility for Continuing Healthcare.
  • Agree and initiate handover arrangements agreed for Specialist Adult Health Services.
  • Support handover of therapy services with Young Person, where criteria is met, and service identified.
  • Liaise with GP/Community Nursing Teams.
  • Consider need to include/inform GP.

 

 

Developing Independence

Year 9:

13-14

  • Start talking about the skills needed for independence in the future.
  • Work with the school to think about curriculum opportunities that might be appropriate to develop young people’s skills around independence i.e., travel training, money/budgeting, domestic skills.
  • Ensure young people and family know how to access information about range of potential housing.

Year 10: 14-15

  • Ensure skills for travelling as independently as possible are being practised, thinking about what young people might need for the future i.e. accessing college, the community and employment.
  • Ensure that young people and families are accessing information about potential housing options.

Year 11: 15-16

  • Think about the link between Career Plans and housing options to ensure people think about where they might live when thinking about jobs.
  • Ensure young person is travelling independently where possible.
  • Where a young person in unable to travel independently, consider support that night be necessary to develop independent travel skills and/or assistance that might be available.
  • Thing about time spent away from home and how this could help to develop independence.
  • Families and young person have information on the range of housing options available.
  • Benefits and money:
  • First benefits check to be arranged at 15.5 years. This is critical to ensure that the family income is maximised.
  • Children’s services may need to apply for National Insurance number if the child/young person is in the care of the authority.

Year 12: 16-17

  • Young person and family have information on the range of housing options available.
  • Young person/family seek benefits advice.
  • Think about personal budgets and how these might be used to personalise a young person’s support.
  • Where a young person is unable to travel independently, consider support that might be necessary to develop independent travel skills and/or assistance that might be available.
  • Apply for Bursary Fund for Vulnerable Adults/Discretionary money through college to help with education-related costs if you’re 16 – 19 years and receive Personal Independence Payment, are in Care, are a Care Leaver or receive Universal Credit.

Year 13: 17-18

  • Young person and family have information on the range of housing options available.
  • Young person/family seek benefits advice.
  • Think about personal budgets and how these might be used to personalise a young person’s support.
  • Where a young person in unable to travel independently, consider support that might be necessary to develop independent travel skills and/or assistance that might be available.

         

Finances:

  • Second Benefits check at age 17.5 to be arranged if leaving education at 18 or circumstances have changed.  This is critical to ensure that the family income is maximised.
  • Consider how Young Person’s money will be managed (e.g., deputyship/appointee ship).

 

 

Preparing for and Finding Employment

Year 9:

13-14

  • Start discussing with school interests, favourite subjects, emerging aspirations about work in the future etc.
  • Agree who will help young person to develop a Career Plan and/or Vocational Profile.
  • Work with school to identify how the curriculum will provide opportunities to explore the world or work and gain work experience.

Year 10: 14-15

  • Start discussions with the school about ‘what I can offer’, ‘what I like doing’, ‘what support I need’.
  • Identify who will support young person to access work experience or work.
  • Agree how young person will access information about supported employment/apprenticeships.
  • Update Career Plan and/or Vocational Profile.
  • Identify aims, goals and outcomes for the future i.e., post-16 learning options, increasing independence skills, meeting ongoing care and support needs.
  • Agree actions required to work toward agreed outcomes, plan visits to taster sessions with post-16 providers and/or invite to review meeting.

Year 11: 15-16

  • Review work experience undertaken and/or plan further opportunities.
  • Continue discussions about future plans and explore a range of options.
  • Where a young person is unable to travel independently, consider assistance available.
  • Explore how any Personal Budget or Direct Payment might be used to support employment aspirations.
  • Explore any other funding that might be available to support young people to find and secure employment.

Year 12: 16-17

  • Ensure Career Plan/Vocational Profile continues to be updated.
  • Plan to spend progressively more time in work related learning or employment that the young person is interested in.
  • Where a young person is unable to travel independently, consider assistance available.
  • Continue to explore all possible options including supported employment, apprenticeships, worked based learning, work related learning at college, paid work, self-employment, higher education.
  • May be eligible to apply for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) if no longer receiving Child Benefit.

Year 13: 17-18

  • Ensure Career Plan/Vocational Profile continues to be updated.
  • Plan to spend progressively more time in work related learning or employment that the young person is interested in.
  • Where a young person is unable to travel independently, consider assistance available.
  • Continue to explore all possible options including supported employment, apprenticeships, worked based learning, work related learning at college, paid work, self-employment, higher education.
  • May be eligible to apply for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) if no longer receiving Child Benefit.

 

 

Ceasing an Education, Health and Care Plan

A local authority can cease to maintain an EHC Plan if it determines that it is no longer necessary for the plan to be maintained if:

  • The young person has taken up paid employment (excluding apprenticeships).
  •  The young person has started higher education (university).
  • A young person aged 18 or over has left education and no longer wishes to engage in further learning.
  • The young person has turned 25.
  • The child or young person has moved to a different local authority.
  • The young person has met their outcomes as specified in their plan.

The Local Authority will do this by issuing a “cease to maintain notice” in writing to the parent or young person, stating the reasons why, after consulting with the young person/ their parents/ carers and Head teacher/ Bubble Lead of Roselyn House School/The RHISE Centre. The young person can appeal if they disagree with the Local Authority’s decision.

 

Continuing Support After Leaving Roselyn House School/ The RHISE Centre

The last year has been particularly difficult due to the Covid 19 pandemic and has specifically hit those students who left us Summer 2020, and is most likely to have the same impact this year.

We discussed with the authorities for further funding to support these students longer (repeating a year would have been best). However, this funding is not available.

Whilst some students have successfully gone on with their next stage career paths others have now left, never attended or have been excluded from their provisions. This is so disappointing considering how far they had come.

We have managed to contact most students and those who have not continued in their provision are now NEET.

We have put in place a way we can continue to support these students ourselves to access facilities and also provide a support system from some of the staff they have worked with at school.  We are utilising Community Services allowing them access to some of the projects along with being able to drop in for a brew/ chat. During these sessions (albeit short), to offer advice of further options available in employment and training.

Further procedures are available for Year 14 and 19-25 by request.

Reviewed: June 2021

S. Damerall

 

 

Covid 19 test information for Parents & Carers Dated 07/10/2021
Information for Prospective New Students
Roselyn House Individual Support EDUCATION Roselyn House Individual Support Education Website

The school health team will continue to operate throughout the covid-19 pandemic. 

Should you need to access the school health team then please telephone 

0300 247 0040 or email vcl.019.singlepointofaccess@nhs.net.

 

The confidential chat health text service is available to students  Mondays to

Friday between the hours of 9-5. The text number is 07507330510

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